Sykes-Picot Agreement Upsc

George Curzon said that the great powers were still committed to the Organic Settlement Agreement, which concerns governance and non-interference in the affairs of the Christian, Orthodox, Druze and Muslim communities concerning the Beirut Vilayet of June 1861 and September 1864, adding that the rights granted to France in present-day Syria and parts of Turkey under Sykes-Picot , are incompatible with this agreement. [78] In conclusion, it can be said that the two agreements were similar in their colonization-oriented approaches. The only differences were that they were aimed at different continents and were welcomed at different times. These agreements provide an overview of the rapid colonization that took place in Asia and Africa by the colonial powers of Europe. After the outbreak of war in the summer of 1914, the Allies – Britain, France and Russia – had much discussion about the future of the Ottoman Empire, which is now fighting on the side of Germany and the central powers, and its vast area in the Middle East, Arabia and southern Europe. In March 1915, Britain signed a secret agreement with Russia, whose plans for the territory of the Empire had prompted the Turks to join Germany and Austria-Hungary in 1914. Under its terms, Russia would annex the Ottoman capital, Constantinople, and retain control of the Dardanelles (the extremely important strait that connects the Black Sea to the Mediterranean) and the Gallipoli Peninsula, the target of a major Allied military invasion, which began in April 1915. In exchange, Russia would accept British claims to other territories of the former Ottoman Empire and Central Persia, including the oil-rich region of Mesopotamia. The French elected Picot as French High Commissioner for the soon-to-be-occupied territory of Syria and Palestine. The British appointed Sykes political chief of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. On April 3, 1917, Sykes met Lloyd George, Curzon and Hankey to receive his instructions on the matter, namely to keep the French on their side as they pushed towards a British Palestine. First Sykes in early May, then by chance, Picot and Sykes visited the Hejaz together in May to discuss the agreement with Fayçal and Hussein.

[55]166 Hussein was persuaded to accept a formula that the French of Syria would follow the same policy as the British in Baghdad. As Hussein believed that Baghdad would be part of the Arab state, he was finally satisfied with this. Subsequent reports from participants expressed doubts as to the exact nature of the discussions and the degree to which Hussein had actually been informed of the Sykes-Picot conditions. [61] The memorandum was forwarded to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and circulated for notice. On 16 January, Sykes informed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that he had spoken to Picot and that he thought Paris could agree.